Disinfo: Belarus means “White Russia” and White Russians identify themselves as culturally Russian

Summary

The West is trying to engineer popular opinion in Belarus towards a “color revolution,” fairly obviously. But they are on a sticky wicket. Western Ukraine was genuinely enthusiastic to move towards the west and the EU, in the hope of attaining a consumer lifestyle. Outside of central Minsk, there is very little such sentiment in Belarus. Most important of all, Belarus means “White Russia,” and the White Russians very strongly identify themselves as culturally Russian.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narratives about the all-Russian nation and Russian world/civilisation, and Western attempts to disrupt Belarusian-Russian relations.

Belarus is a sovereign state with a strong national and cultural identity.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 208
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 20/08/2020
  • Language/target audience: English
  • Country: Ukraine, Belarus
  • Keywords: Protest, Colour revolutions

Disclaimer

Cases in the EUvsDisinfo database focus on messages in the international information space that are identified as providing a partial, distorted, or false depiction of reality and spread key pro-Kremlin messages. This does not necessarily imply, however, that a given outlet is linked to the Kremlin or editorially pro-Kremlin, or that it has intentionally sought to disinform. EUvsDisinfo publications do not represent an official EU position, as the information and opinions expressed are based on media reporting and analysis of the East Stratcom Task Force.

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Ukraine and Belarus are within Moscow’s rightful sphere of influence

Russian leaders have reason to regard Ukraine and Belarus as being within Moscow’s rightful sphere of influence. Indeed, those two nations are within Russia’s core security zone, and the Kremlin will likely go to great lengths to prevent an even bigger NATO military presence on its borders than the one that exists now.

Disproof

Both Ukraine and Belarus are independent countries and not subject to "spheres of influence" of foreign powers. International law excludes the concept of "spheres of interests".

See related disinformation cases on Belarus.

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[…]

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Disproof

The preliminary test results from the Charité – Universitätsmedizin hospital in Berlin indicate that the Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned during his stay in Siberia.

Clinical findings indicate poisoning with a substance from the group of cholinesterase inhibitors. The specific substance involved remains unknown.

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Disproof

A recurring pro-Kremlin narrative about Russophobia, allegedly directed at the pro-Kremlin media.

The Youtube account of the TV channel "Tsargrad", owned by Russian businessman Konstantin Malofeev, was blocked due to a violation of the law. Google representatives commented to RBC about it.