Europeans have realised that sanctions against Russia are totally ineffective

Summary

The procedure to extend the sanctions requires a unanimous vote, i.e. if one EU member state votes against the continuation of sanctions, they will be lifted. Such a possibility is quite realistic given the current mood in Europe, which is mostly constructive towards Russia. This means that the Europeans have finally realised that sanctions against Russia are totally ineffective.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative that Western sanctions against Russia are unjust and ineffective.

The sanctions are not a means of protectionism but were introduced after Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea and the downing of the Malaysian passenger plane MH17. The latest decision on a six-month extension of EU sanctions against Russian was taken on the 12th of September 2019, lasting until March 2020.

Further reading on the Russian narrative about ineffective Western sanctions by StopFake. More cases related to sanctions are available here.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 165
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06/09/2019
  • Language/target audience: Russian
  • Country: Russia, EU
  • Keywords: Sanctions
  • Outlet: Sputnik Georgia
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All throughout the post-war period the Soviet Union kept the world from complete disaster and complete wildness

All throughout the post-war period, the Soviet Union kept the world from complete disaster and complete wildness.

Disproof

This case represents a manipulation of historical facts to downplay and justify Russian aggression towards European countries. See similar cases here.

It is important to mention the The Marshall Plan, also known as the European Recovery Program, which was a U.S. program providing aid to Western Europe following the devastation of World War II. As the designer of the plan, George C. Marshall himself said: "Our policy is not directed against any country, but against hunger, poverty, desperation and chaos."

Poland posed a military threat to the USSR in 1938-1939

Throughout 1938-1939, the Soviet military functionaries assumed that the most probable security threat for the USSR came not only from a military union of Germany and Italy, but also from Poland, which appeared in the “orbit” of the Nazi block. Thus, the USSR had to be prepared for a fight on two fronts – in the West (against Germany and Poland) and in the East (against Japan).

Disproof

This message is part of the Kremlin’s policy of historical revisionism – it tries to explain the necessity of signing of the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact and German and Soviet attacks on Poland in September 1939 by alleged “military threats” coming from Poland.

See other examples referring to the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact here, here and here.