Further deployment of US troops in Poland is a violation of the Russia-NATO Act of 1997

Summary

Further deployment of US troops in Poland will be a violation of the Founding Act signed between Russia and NATO in 1997.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative about the US presence in Europe and hostile NATO plans against Russia (see examples here and here).

On June 12th 2019, the United States and Poland signed a Joint Declaration on Defence Cooperation. The main agreements are to increase the presence of the US military and create special bases for them in Poland. Currently, about 4,500 US troops are based on a rotational basis in Poland. It is assumed that in the near future, the contingent will increase by another 1000 troops (relocated from the US military in Germany).

The Founding Act on Mutual Relations, Cooperation and Security between NATO and the Russian Federation signed in 1997 does not prohibit the deployment of NATO troops from other countries on the territory of new NATO members in Eastern and Central Europe. Thus, NATO treaties with Russia will not be violated, as the total number of military personnel in the European Union will not change, only a redeployment of troops will take place.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 155
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 13/06/2019
  • Language/target audience: Polish
  • Country: Poland, United States, Russia
  • Keywords: US presence in Europe, NATO
  • Outlet: Sputnik Polska
see more

NATO bombed Serbia in order to make it its member

NATO bombed Serbia in order to make it a member of the Alliance. This goal, which for understandable reasons was not so obvious immediately after the air raids, became more and more obvious over time.

Disproof

Disinformation narrative consistent with recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation about NATO aggression.

NATO's military intervention was not intended to make Serbia a member of the alliance. It launched a campaign of air strikes against Serbia beginning on the 24th of March 1999 to stop Belgrade's crackdown against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo. The primary purpose of the campaign was to end violence and repression and force Milošević to withdraw his military, police and para-military forces from Kosovo (see NATO statement from 1999).

The NATO bombing of Yugoslavia in 1999 killed thousands of Serbs

The NATO bombing of Yugoslavia in 1999 killed thousands of Serbs.

In 1999, NATO bombed Serbia for 78 days. The exact number of victims of the Alliance’s air operation was not officially reported, but according to Serbian estimates, between 1200 and 2500 people were killed and around 6000 injured.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative about the number of civilian casualties of NATO bombing,

In Serbia (excluding Kosovo) and Montenegro, 275 persons lost their lives in the NATO bombings: 180 civilians, 90 members of the Yugoslav Armed Forces and 5 members of the Ministry of Interior of Serbia.

USA promised Russia that there will be no NATO expansion to the East

The USA promised Russia that there will be no NATO expansion to the  East.

US Secretary of State, James Baker, had agreed with Gorbachev in 1990 in his negotiations on German reunification that there would be no expansion of NATO beyond the then eastern borders of the GDR.

“Baker noted this oral promise in a note: “End result: Unified Ger. anchored* in a changed (polit.) NATO -* whose jurisdiction. would not move* eastwards!”

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation that NATO had promised that the Alliance would not expand to the East and that NATO is de facto aggressive.

NATO allies take decisions by consensus and these are recorded. There is no record of any such decision having been taken by NATO or the US. Personal assurances from individual leaders cannot replace Alliance consensus' and do not constitute formal NATO agreements. Moreover, at the time of the alleged promise, the Warsaw Pact still existed.  Its members did not agree on its dissolution until 1991. This was confirmed by Mikhail Gorbachev himself in an interview with Russia Beyond the Headlines: