Disinfo: A junta took power in Ukraine after 2013-2014 revolution

Summary

These militants [Euromaidan participants] know well that without them, without their criminal actions to seize power by force, there would be no Poroshenko or Turchinov, who are correctly called the junta. They gained legitimacy later, already in a destroyed and torn country, where fascists from the streets took power. “The street” understands this perfectly. The militants have reasons to consider themselves a protected caste because they are responsible for the legitimacy of this regime, which took power after the February 2014 events.

Disproof

This is a recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative painting the 2013-14 protests in Kyiv as a coup that brought to power a fascist regime.

Ukraine is not governed by a junta. Democratic, competitive and generally well-organised presidential and parliamentary elections were held in 2014 and local elections in 2015. The EU welcomed this progress. The OSCE, which observed all these elections on the ground, characterised the presidential elections as showing the "clear resolve of the authorities to hold what was a genuine election largely in line with international commitments and with a respect for fundamental freedoms."

The 2019 early parliamentary elections, according to the preliminary statement of the OSCE, were efficiently run and respected fundamental freedoms.

The European Parliament election observation delegation to Ukraine said in a statement that notwithstanding the fact that the elections were taking place a few months earlier than planned, one can undoubtedly say that they were competitive, well-administered and managed in an efficient way.

The demonstrations which began in Kyiv in November 2013 – called "Maidan", or "Euromaidan" – were a result of the Ukrainian people's frustration with former President Yanukovych's last-minute U-turn when, after seven years of negotiation, he refused to sign the EU–Ukraine Association Agreement and halted progress towards Ukraine's closer relationship with the EU due to Russian pressure. The protesters' demands included constitutional reform, a stronger role for parliament, formation of a government of national unity, an end to corruption, early presidential elections and an end to violence.

For similar cases, see here.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 198
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05/05/2020
  • Language/target audience: Russian
  • Country: Ukraine
  • Keywords: Ukraine, Junta, Coup, Euromaidan, Petro Poroshenko
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Poroshenko and the IMF destroyed the Ukrainian banking system

[…] for five years, Poroshenko, Gontareva [the former head of the National Bank of Ukraine], and some IMF representatives have robbed the banking system of Ukraine and plundered the country’s assets. In particular, the National Bank has been destroying banks and the Deposit Guarantee Fund has been selling banks’ assets.

Disproof

Conspiracy theory. Pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative that undermines the banking sector reform in Ukraine and, in particular, the adoption of the anti-oligarch banking law on May 13.

The anti-oligarch banking law, officially titled "Draft Law on Amendments to Certain Legislative Acts of Ukraine Concerning the Improvement of Certain Mechanisms for Banking Regulation", is designed to prevent the return of nationalised or liquidated banks to their owners. Over 100 commercial banks have been closed since the banking reform started in 2014.

The Association Agreement destroyed Ukrainian economy, it became a Western colony

Almost six years have passed [since the Association Agreement was signed between Ukraine and the EU]. What did this widely advertised agreement give to Ukraine? Judge for yourself. Ukraine has become the poorest country in Europe and one of the poorest in the world. The Ukrainian economy was destroyed. Investments fell to zero. This means that the country has essentially become a colony of the West and has lost its independence.

Disproof

Conspiracy theory. Recurring pro-Kremlin narrative on Ukraine and its relations with the European Union.

In June 2014, the EU and Ukraine signed an Association Agreement, including a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area (DCFTA), which promotes deeper political ties, stronger economic links and the respect for common values. Since 2014, the EU and the Financial Institutions have mobilised more than €15 billion in grants and loans to support the reform process, with strong conditionality on continued progress. See here for more details about EU-Ukraine relations.

Euromaidan was initiated to lower Ukraine’s living standards

Now everyone understands why the Maidan was needed. It was necessary to lower the standard of living of Ukrainians. It has to be so low that they [Ukrainians] must be very happy to go to Europe [and earn money there]: to plow the land for 16 hours a day and to be bent over in the fields under the sun.

Disproof

Conspiracy theory. Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narratives about the 2013-14 Ukrainian revolution.

The demonstrations which began in Kyiv in November 2013 – called "Maidan", or "Euromaidan" – were a result of the Ukrainian people's frustration with former President Yanukovych's last-minute U-turn when, after seven years of negotiation, he refused to sign the EU–Ukraine Association Agreement and halted progress towards Ukraine's closer relationship with the EU due to Russian pressure.