Latvia lost its sovereignty to the EU

Summary

Latvia has no sovereignty in the EU. It has its flag and coat of arms but virtually no economy is left. The country lost a third of its population and its foreign policy is totally dictated by Brussels and Washington with no space for an independent policy left.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin narratives about lost sovereignty, external control and socio-economic degradation of the Baltic states in the EU.

Latvia is a sovereign country, which determines its domestic and foreign policies. 

See earlier disinformation cases alleging that Latvia is a US vassal state, that the Baltic states pursue anti-Belarusian policies as instructed by external actors, that Lithuania is a "typical dying young democracy", and that the Baltic states are dying because they chose not to be with Russia.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 159
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 26/07/2019
  • Language/target audience: Belarus
  • Country: Latvia, Baltic states, EU
  • Keywords: Sovereignty
  • Outlet: Grani Formata @ Sputnik Belarus time 08:12 - 08:33
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Poland did not invite Putin to the WWII commemoration ceremony to disrupt Belarus-Russia relations

By refusing to invite Russian President Vladimir Putin to the WWII commemoration ceremony Poland attempts to turn Belarus and Russia against each other. They hope that if [Belarusian president] Lukashenka comes to the ceremony and Putin does not, there will be bad blood between two of them.

Disproof

Conspiracy theory consistent with recurring pro-Kremlin narratives about the West's anti-Russian actions and attempts to discredit and disrupt Belarus-Russia relations.

Poland's decision not to invite the Russian delegation to WWII commemoration ceremony has to do with Russian aggression against Ukraine. Krzysztof Szczerski, chief advisor to the Polish president, stated in March 2019 that the anniversary ceremony will be held “in the company of countries with whom Poland now cooperates closely for peace based on the respect for international law, for the sovereignty of nations and of their territories”. This point was reiterated by Jacek Sasin, Polish deputy prime minister in July, who said: "I think it would be inappropriate to mark the anniversary of the beginning of the armed aggression against Poland with the participation of a leader who today treats his neighbours using the same methods."

Outsiders are putting a lot of effort to prevent rapprochement of Georgia and Russia

Russophobia in Georgia is artificial. Georgian people don’t have a negative attitude towards Russians and Russia. But Georgia doesn’t have its voice. The current government of Georgia is not independent, it broadcasts a foreign voice. The “patrons” from the outside are doing everything to prevent Georgia from getting closer to Russia. They work very actively with civil society, and this will not end tomorrow.

 

 

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative about the US presence in Europe and color revolutions.

Pro-Kremlin media consistently claims that Georgian elected president and authorities are not independent and do not work in the interests of their people, they have Western curators and all kind of protests are "West engineered". See for example previous disinformation case claimingthat Western attempts to sever relations between Russia and Georgia.

Bulgarians have not seen any significant benefits from membership of the EU and NATO

Bulgarians have not seen any significant benefits from EU membership. Furthermore, they benefited even less from joining NATO.

Disproof

These claims are false. Bulgaria joined the European Union in 2007; as a result, its GDP, exports, average annual wages, as well as a share of products created in their economies by the industrial sector increased. In 2006, before joining the European Union, Bulgaria’s GDP was estimated at USD 34.4 billion; in 2016, this figure increased to USD 52.4 billion. In 2006, the GDP per capita was equal to USD 6 107.71 and in 2016 it increased to USD 7 926.

European countries account for 78% of Bulgarian exports. Find out more about how Bulgaria benefits from EU funding.