‘Like denying the Holocaust’: Ukraine makes post-WWII nationalist fighters as privileged as war vets

Summary

Ukrainian parliament has passed a law, which gives Nazi-collaborating nationalist fighters, who fought against the Soviet Union after the end of World War II, the same status as the people who fought against Nazis during the war.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation about Ukraine and the Nazis.

None of the organizations mentioned in the new Ukrainian law about social protection of participants in the struggle for country's independence in the 20th century are Nazi, the Insider notes.

Ukraine condemns Nazi regime and the promotion of its symbols.

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation about Ukraine and the Nazis that is repeated ever since the outbreak of the Euromaidan revolution.

Further debunking by The Insider.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 129
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 07/12/2018
  • Language/target audience: English
  • Country: USSR, Ukraine
  • Keywords: WWII, Nazi/Fascist
  • Outlet: Russia Today
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Poroshenko is willing to provoke bloodshed to get re-elected


Poroshenko is, as we see in Kerch, as we see in Donbas, willing to do anything and provoke any kind of bloodshed in order to secure his re-election, however improbable it is.

Disproof

Trending issue in Georgia: Islamic terrorists and migrants

Georgian nation expressed its opinion by this voting [Presidential elections], but as far as I know, people’s concerns are related not as much to these elections, as to the situation in the region, to the flow of Islamic terrorists. They have settled pretty well in Georgia and the population awaits that the government will resolve this issue somehow. There are lots of migrants in Georgia and they feel quite well there. It has to be said that this is a trending issue, however barely discussed

Disproof

According to public opinion polls, Georgians are mostly concerned about economical issues rather than about the threat of terrorism or migration. According to the UN's 2017 International Migration Report, migrants make up a total of 2% of the Georgian population and there is a 2,63% increase in migration to Georgia over the past 17 years.

Further debunking by Mythdetector.