One of the main reasons why Maidan was conceived: to have a NATO base in Crimea

Summary

One of the main goals, why Maidan was conceived: to have a NATO base in Crimea. Russia brilliantly blocked it.

Disproof

A highly repeated disinformation claim in Russian media about Euromaidan and Crimea. The alleged encroachments of NATO on the Ukrainian peninsula are among the most common disinformation narratives, to justify the illegal annexation of Crimea.

Euromaidan was a result of the Ukrainian people's frustration with former President Yanukovych’s sudden departure from the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement. More cases on this topic here.

The NATO expansion is also a recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative. NATO does not "expand" in the imperialistic sense described by the Kremlin leadership and Russian state media, but instead considers the applications of candidate countries that want to join the defensive alliance of their own national will. NATO enlargement is not directed against Russia.

The claim that NATO was planning to base ships and missiles in Crimea is fiction. The idea has never been proposed, suggested or discussed within NATO. In the Statement by the North Atlantic Council on Crimea on 18 March 2019, NATO condemned Russia's ongoing and wide-ranging military build-up in Crimea, and expressed concern by Russia's efforts and stated plans for a further military build-up in the Black Sea region.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 164
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 13/09/2019
  • Language/target audience: Russian, Ukrainian
  • Country: Ukraine
  • Keywords: Ukraine, EU/NATO enlargement, NATO, Euromaidan, Crimea
  • Outlet: Vremya Pokazhet @ Channel 1 time 15:01-15:12
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Ukraine organised the Maidan protests to get rid of the Russian speaking part of the country

Ukraine does not need its Russian-speaking and pro-Russian part if it wants to become a European country. Ukraine even organised the Maidan protests to get rid of the Russian-speaking and pro-Russian citizens.

Disproof

This is a recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative about Euromaidan.

The spontaneous onset of the Euromaidan protests was a reaction by several segments of the Ukrainian population to former President Yanukovych’s sudden departure from the promised Association Agreement with the European Union in November 2013. See the full debunk here. The protests had nothing to do with the "Russian-speaking and pro-Russian part of the country".

In March 2014 Crimea became part of Russia as a result of a referendum

In March 2014 Crimea became part of Russia as a result of a referendum.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative claiming that Crimean citizens chose to re-join Russia through a legal referendum.

Crimea is a part of Ukraine and was illegally annexed by Russia. In 2014, Russian troops obliged the parliament of Crimea to organise a referendum, which was deemed illegitimate under international law, and then formally annexed the peninsula and brought it under Russian territorial control. Following the covert invasion by “little green men,” the referendum in Crimea was conducted hastily and at gunpointbarring impartial observers from entering the peninsula.

In 2014 there was a coup d’état in Ukraine

In 2014 there was a coup d’état in Ukraine.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin narrative claiming that there was a coup d’état in Kyiv in 2014.

The demonstrations which began in Kyiv in November 2013 and ended in February 2014 were not provoked by foreign powers, but were a result of the Ukrainian people's frustration with former President Yanukovych after his refusal to sign the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement promised for years. The protesters' demands included constitutional reform, a stronger role for parliament, formation of a government of national unity, an end to corruption, early presidential elections and an end to violence. See the full debunk here.