Disinfo: Russia Segodnya and RT are different entities

Summary

The Radio and Television Broadcasting Commission of Lithuania has banned the broadcasting of 5 channels belonging to the RT network, due to European sanctions imposed on the Director-General of the “Russia Segodnya” media agency Dmitry Kiselyov.

Kiselyov is head of “Russia Segodnya” agency, the latter and the RT network are two different legal entities.

RT is run by its editor-in-chief, Margarita Simonyan, who is not subject to any European sanctions.

Disproof

A recurrent narrative claiming that the Baltic states act irrationally against RT.

Latvia and Lithuania have banned the state-owned Russian television channel RT, saying it is controlled by an individual, Dmitriy Kiselyov, who is under EU sanctions. According to the Electronic Mass Media Council (NEPLP), Latvia's national media watchdog, RT and the network of channels operated by it are under Kiselyov's "effective control".

Read full NEPLP's position here for details.

For further debunking please see the Insider.

Read similar stories: Russian Media are being discriminated against in the Baltic states, Estonian laws only foresee asset freezing for people and companies mentioned in the EU sanctions list, and Latvia’s decision against RT is “stupid and ignorant” blinded by “Russophobia”.

Disclaimer

Cases in the EUvsDisinfo database focus on messages in the international information space that are identified as providing a partial, distorted, or false depiction of reality and spread key pro-Kremlin messages. This does not necessarily imply, however, that a given outlet is linked to the Kremlin or editorially pro-Kremlin, or that it has intentionally sought to disinform. EUvsDisinfo publications do not represent an official EU position, as the information and opinions expressed are based on media reporting and analysis of the East Stratcom Task Force.

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Constitutional amendments unleashed Russophobia because the West doesn’t like a strong Russia

The West doesn’t like a strong and firm Russia, which is not convenient for its interests. That’s why the Russophobia unleashed in face of the recent referendum on Constitutional amendments aims to discredit Russia in the eyes of the international community and to generate disconformity and internal breaches. Hegemonic mainstream media, some political institutes and NGOs used every mean at hand to express their rejection of Russia’s democratic procedure. They even tried to deter Russian voters from taking part in the voting.

Disproof

No evidence given. International criticism of some aspects of the referendum on Constitutional amendments was not due to alleged “Russophobia” but to its problematic aspects, such as Article 79, which stipulates that “decisions of interstate bodies” shall not be “subject to enforcement in the Russian Federation” if they run counter to the Constitution. This means, for example, that Russia won’t feel obliged to comply with binding rulings of the European Court of Human Rights. Other elements, such as its definition of marriage as the union of man and woman, have been strongly criticised by LGBT activists and human rights defenders. One of the most controversial amendments, removing term limits for president Vladimir Putin to remain in power beyond his original mandate, was also condemned by Russian pro-democracy and opposition activists.

The European Union regretted that, in the run up to this vote, campaigning both for and against was not allowed, thereby denying voters access to balanced information.

Latvia is blinded by Russophobia 

The decision to ban television broadcasts of RT is an indication of the level of stupidity and ignorance of the Latvian authorities, who have been blinded by the Russophobia, indicating that the reason for the ban has no legal meaning.

Disproof

A recurrent narrative against the Baltic states allegedly being Russophobic and acting irrationally against RT and Sputnik.

Latvia has banned the state-owned Russian television channel RT, saying it is controlled by an individual, Dmitriy Kiselyov, who is under EU sanctions. According to the Electronic Mass Media Council (NEPLP), Latvia's national media watchdog, RT and the network of channels operated by it are under Kiselyov's "effective control". Read full NEPLP's position here for details.

Reason behind sanctioning RT in Latvia is still unclear

The National Council of Electronic Media of Latvia has banned the broadcast of seven channels belonging to the RT group on the basis of personal sanctions, imposed by the European Union against Dmitry Kiselyov.

It is worth noting that the Russian journalist and TV presenter is the general director of the Russian news agency “Russia Segodnya”, to which RT does not belong, so how did the National Council of Electronic Media in Latvia link Kiselyov to this channel remains unclear.

Disproof

A recurrent narrative against the Baltic states allegedly acting irrationally against RT and Sputnik.

Latvia and Lithuania have banned the state-owned Russian television channel RT, saying it is controlled by an individual, Dmitriy Kiselyov, who is under EU sanctions. According to the Electronic Mass Media Council (NEPLP), Latvia's national media watchdog, RT and the network of channels operated by it are under Kiselyov's "effective control".