Disinfo: “Russian threat” is only a pretext to station NATO military contingents near Russian borders

Summary

Western politicians, especially from the Baltic countries and Poland, keep talking about an alleged Russian threat. However, the alliance is fully aware that Russia would never attack a NATO country. The emphasis on the alleged “Russian threat” is only a pretext for stationing more military technology and NATO military contingents near the Russian borders.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative claiming that the “Russian threat” is a false idea created and spread by NATO to encircle and weaken Russia.

In fact, Russia’s annexation of Crimea and destabilisation of Eastern Ukraine in early 2014 was widely viewed both in North America and in Europe as violating the basic rules of the post-Cold War European order, especially the rule that borders are inviolable and the states should not use force to alter them or take territory from other states. As a result of Russia’s aggressive actions in Ukraine, many Western states - including key EU members such as Germany and France - critically reassessed their “strategic partnership” policies towards Russia and began to view Russia as a serious challenge to the European security order.

NATO is not a threat to Russia. NATO is a defensive alliance. Its purpose is to protect the member states. NATO's exercises and military deployments are not directed against Russia – nor any other country. However, in March 2014, in response to Russia's aggressive actions against Ukraine, NATO suspended practical cooperation with Russia. NATO does not seek confrontation, but it cannot ignore Russia breaking international rules, undermining stability and security. See more for NATO's response to the crisis in Ukraine and security concerns in Central and Eastern Europe here.

Read more similar cases alleging that NATO exploits non-existent “Russian threat” to increase its presence close to Russian borders and that the US creates and spreads a false image about an “aggressive” Russia constituting a security “threat”.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 181
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 10/01/2020
  • Language/target audience: German
  • Country: Russia, Baltic states, US, Poland
  • Keywords: security threat, EU, West, EU/NATO enlargement, Encircling Russia, Anti-Russian, NATO
  • Outlet: Sputnik Deutschland
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Disproof

Recurrent Russian disinformation narrative that portrays Baltic states as dictatorial regimes that practice discrimination against their Russian minorities and that accuse Estonia in particular of oppressing Russian media and of currently persecuting Sputnik Estonia.

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Disproof

A recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative accusing the West, and in this case the EU, of separating Russia from its neighbours.

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Disproof

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