Disinfo: Ukraine has to return Lviv to Poland

Summary

Ukraine should return Lviv to Poland. If you think like all those people who are revising history, then, according to their logic, they should return Lviv to Poland.

Disproof

Pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative designed to denigrate the history of Ukraine, Ukrainian statehood and its independence.

On December 1, 1991, the All-Ukrainian Referendum on Independence was held in Ukraine. It confirmed the Act of Independence of Ukraine that was adopted by the Verkhovna Rada on August 24, 1991. On December 2, Poland recognised Ukraine’s independence and made no territorial claims against Kyiv.

Poland and the EU strongly supports the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. The EU continues to extend sanctions against Russia for its violations of Ukraine's territorial integrity.

publication/media

  • Reported in: Issue 196
  • DATE OF PUBLICATION: 12/05/2020
  • Language/target audience: , , Russian
  • Country: Ukraine, Poland
  • Keywords: Ukrainian statehood
  • Outlet: Polnyi Contact @ Radio Vesti
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Errors and lack of evidence in the investigation of the MH17 case

The investigation of the MH17 case can hardly be called objective because, from the very beginning, the Dutch experts made a large number of mistakes. Therefore you cannot trust the results of their activities. The investigation did not offer anything new, but rather, it came across as “outright fakes”.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative about MH17, involving an attempt to discredit the Joint International Investigation (JIT) and the criminal trial that is underway in the Hague. The article doesn't provide any evidence of the alleged fakes or "mistakes" of the JIT investigation.

The special team known as the Joint Investigation Team (JIT) was established to conduct the criminal inquiry into the downing of flight MH17. The JIT comprises officials from the Dutch Public Prosecution Service and the Dutch police, along with police and criminal justice authorities from Australia, Belgium, Malaysia and Ukraine.

Poland uses Russophobia to raise its status in the Western community

Polish President Andrzej Duda signed an updated national security strategy for the country, which focuses on the military threat that allegedly comes from Russia.

Polish authorities purposefully intimidate citizens with the “Russian threat”, fixing in official documents unconfirmed information about alleged “hybrid wars” and “cyber attacks” conducted by Russian intelligence agencies, and about “aggressive plans” of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

Russophobia serves as a way for the ruling elite to rally the nation in the face of an imaginary enemy. Also, with the help of anti-Russian policy, Warsaw is trying to raise its status in the Western community.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative equating criticism of the Kremlin's actions or policies with "Russophobia", i.e., an irrational and unjustified hatred of Russia itself. The Polish authorities do not promote any policy of “intimidation with Russia” and they do not fuel the “anti-Russian propaganda”. Poland's primary Russia-related concerns are a result of Russia's annexation of Crimea and its ongoing involvement in the military conflict in eastern Ukraine. The Polish government shows its full support to Ukraine in the war and supports complete restoration of Ukraine's territorial integrity.

The full text of Poland's 2020 national security strategy is available here. On Polish security concerns regarding Russia, the document states:

More than 7000 POWs were buried alive, killed in gas chambers or shot by Finns in Karelia during WWII

More than 7000 POWs were buried alive, killed in gas chambers or shot by Finns in Karelia during WWII, says Investigative Committee of Russia, which has opened a genocide investigation of Finns conducting mass killings in Karelia during WWII.

Disproof

Recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation message focusing on Finland and Russia's Karelia during WWII. In October 2019, Russia's Security Service FSB released "secret documents" about the conditions in the Finnish camps. In April 2020, more documents were published, and former prisoners of the Finnish concentration camps asked the head of the Russian Investigating committee Alexander Bastrykin to launch an investigation into crimes of the occupying authorities during the war.

While it is true, therefor, that Russia's investigative committee has indeed launched such an investigation, the media outlet in question repeats its questionable claims without challenging them.