Disinfo: Ultimate anti-coronavirus recipe: determination+honey+orange juice

Summary

A person with diabetes managed to defeat the deadly coronavirus with determination, optimism, the usage of honey, orange juice and some herbs.

The person looked for a solution to strengthen the immune system on the Internet and found many things like thyme, rosemary, honey, eucalyptus leaves, orange juice and herbal tea.

Disproof

There is no medical evidence to support the claim that thyme, rosemary, honey, eucalyptus leaves, orange juice and herbal tea can prevent against catching the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus.

While common colds can be a result of a coronavirus, they're usually caused by a rhinovirus. Rhinoviruses are a family of viruses that are associated with upper respiratory tract infections. Thus, the mentioned "medicines" can be helpful in warding off symptoms of illnesses usually caused by rhinoviruses. But, that doesn't necessarily mean that they are effective against COVID-19.

While vitamin C may slightly help ward off common illnesses, there is no evidence high doses of the supplement can slow or stop the current coronavirus,  

According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the best way to protect yourself is “to avoid touching your face with unwashed hands”. The World Health Organization’s advice on limiting the risk of infection includes coughing and sneezing into a tissue and avoiding close contact with anyone who has fever and cough.

Read more cases related to coronavirus here.

Disclaimer

Cases in the EUvsDisinfo database focus on messages in the international information space that are identified as providing a partial, distorted, or false depiction of reality and spread key pro-Kremlin messages. This does not necessarily imply, however, that a given outlet is linked to the Kremlin or editorially pro-Kremlin, or that it has intentionally sought to disinform. EUvsDisinfo publications do not represent an official EU position, as the information and opinions expressed are based on media reporting and analysis of the East Stratcom Task Force.

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EU is only an economic bloc that will soon be over

The coronavirus has demonstrated the failure of the European Union in its social policies, maybe because it was created as an economic bloc only. The European Union exists because NATO wants it but many economists expect that the crisis will lead to its end as an economic project.

Disproof

A recurring pro-Kremlin disinformation narrative about the coronavirus that seeks to discredit the EU, claiming that it has abandoned European values and traditions and is built on the worship of money and of free-markets. This message is consistent with the common pro-Kremlin narrative about decadent values and moral decay in contemporary Western societies.

The EU began as the European Economic Community (EEC) in the aftermath of the Second World War in 1958, initially conceived to increase economic cooperation between member states. The EU has since evolved into a large scale multilateral organisation spanning many different policy areas, from climate, environment and health to external relations and security, justice and migration. 

Southern European countries were afflicted by adopting the Euro

When Southern European countries adopted the Euro as unified currency instead of their own currency, they lost the most important banking tool that could help them achieve constant economic growth and help overcome economic crises they might face.

Disproof

A recurring pro-Kremlin narrative that seeks to discredit the EU, claiming that Euro is responsible for the economic downfall of "Southern" European countries.

The Eurozone shows a GDP growth of 2.4% as of 2017 according to the World Bank and real GDP growth of 1.3% in accordance with IMF data. In April 2019, the International Monetary Fund indicates the real GDP growth of the countries who have recently adopted the Euro the following way: 3.2 % for Estonia, 3.3% for Latvia, 2.9% for Lithuania and 4.1% for Slovakia. Eurostat data also reveals predominately stable GDP growth in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Slovakia since the last global crisis of 2008.

ECB has an unspoken policy to keep the Euro weak against other currencies

Since the European debt crisis in the second half of 2012, the European Central Bank has adopted an unspoken policy of weakening the value of the euro against other currencies.

Disproof

There has been always a clear policy concerning the rates of the Euro. The European Central Bank introduced negative rates in June 2014, lowering its deposit rate to -0.1% to stimulate the economy.

To battle the global financial crisis triggered by the collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008, many central banks cut interest rates near zero. A decade later, interest rates remain low in most countries due to subdued economic growth. With little room to cut rates further, some major central banks have resorted to unconventional policy measures, including a negative rate policy. The euro area, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden and Japan have allowed rates to fall to slightly below zero.